Intelligent surveillance

Traditionally, security departments used video analytics as a reactive tool that could detect something in a live video stream and then create an event that operators could respond to. Leveraging the latest innovations, organisations realise that video and other related data from access control can be used for more than physical security

Surveillance, Gene, Panasonic, Middle East, Security, Artificial Intelligence

Video surveillance solutions are getting smarter and providing more than just live video feeds or recorded clips. According to 6Wresearch, the Middle East video surveillance market is expected to reach $1.8 billion by 2021. While the general market outlook for surveillance software in the Middle East is positive, growth is stronger in enterprise applications, which include critical infrastructure, government installations and airports.

But enterprise customers are increasingly moving towards unified security environments, where multiple systems combine to provide a comprehensive view of security and operational events. As such, demand for systems that help bring together data from multiple systems and guide response is especially strong.

The multiplication of sensors is also leading to greater interest in technologies such as video analytics and automation solutions that can make sense of data points.

Genetec’s regional director for META, Firas Jadalla explains that while artificial intelligence is becoming a household name, it’s not yet a household reality. “AI is an appealing term that is wide open to interpretation and comes with a variety of pop culture associations. But today’s AI cannot do the vast majority of what we’ve seen it do on the big screen. The science just doesn’t exist. Where science is making significant advancements is in the area of machine learning,” adds Jadalla.

Machine learning uses data to help a computer improve performance without being explicitly programmed. It allows programmers to enable a computer to assess and alter its processes through training.  In some cases, a computer can be programmed with algorithms that make it possible for it to determine which features it should use in the identification process to efficiently produce the most accurate output. As an example, a computer could be trained to determine whether colour or shape is a better indicator to classify a new input. In this case, programmers do not tell the computer which to use, but instead allow it to ‘choose’ for itself.

While artificial intelligence is becoming a household name, it’s not yet a household reality, says Jadalla.

Organisations want to make informed decisions and for that they need access to as much information as possible. Then, rather than implementing a new information gathering system, they can mine the data already being collected by their physical security systems. However, it is not enough to simply access this data; the data also needs to be in a form that is usable and beneficial. This is where video analytics plays a cruicial role.

Video analytics has been part of security systems for more than 10 years. Traditionally, security departments used video analytics as a reactive tool that could detect something in a live video stream and then created an event that operators could respond to. Leveraging the latest innovations, organisations realise that video and other related data from access control can be used for more than physical security.

Recognising the need for data and analytics in IP surveillance, Panasonic offers end-to-end video and access control solutions to its customers in every market, regardless of complexity and budgets.

“Video analytics bring substantial benefits to the industry primarily because it allows for immediate actionable insights based on data gathered through capabilities such as facial recognition, emotion detection etc.  To give an example, advanced video analysis plays a key role in a variety of urban initiatives such as traffic management,” says Yoshiki Kogane, Panasonic Marketing MEA.


Video analytics bring substantial benefits to the industry primarily because it allows for immediate actionable insights based on data gathered, says Kogane.

Video analytics, powered by the advances in computing power, has evolved considerably to extract very reliable and powerful data from video streams. And the industry itself is getting better at presenting the mined data in more consumable ways, adds Kogane. “We’re seeing a more end-user-oriented approach towards the development of systems. Instead of just providing all the data that is available, solution providers are looking at what users actually need and how to present that information in the clearest possible way.”

Owing to increasing investments for infrastructure development and stringent regulatory policies, high-value companies in retail, healthcare, banking and finance, transportation, education and hospitality segments have preferred advanced IP surveillance systems.

Kogane adds that the benefits that IP surveillance technologies bring to government offices, public areas and high traffic spaces (such as airports, sports arenas and railway stations) also generate demand for deployment of high-tech video surveillance systems. “Panasonic’s scalable customised product solutions cater to a wide range of industries and sectors that include hospitality, education, real estate, corporates, healthcare, retail, entertainment and logistics,” adds Kogane.

Cybersecurity is one of the most important considerations when deploying a video surveillance solution. A poorly secured camera, unencrypted communications between a server and client application, or out-of-date firmware can all be exploited by cybercriminals. It is critical to have a unified platform that employs a security strategy that protects against both physical and cyberthreats. It should ideally come  with multiple layers of defense including encryption, multi-factor authentication and authorisation.

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